Posts Tagged ‘Future’

HOW Future Will Look Like

This is the a film about This how future will look (2030 – 2050) from Future Technology HD 2017.

Sea level rise

Reportedly that the rate of sea level rise may increase even faster than scientists could expect. Actually there are many causes why that can happen. But one of them is the melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The ice sheet is accounted as an “unstoppable” yet. In the U.S. alone, nearly 30,000 square miles of land – home to 12.3 million people today – lies less than 10 feet under the high-tide line, including more than half the area of 40 large U.S. cities like New York City, Boston and New Orleans. Roughly one third of the U.S. population lives on low-lying land that is vulnerable to consequences of varying severity, from permanent inundation to saltwater intrusion into freshwater sources. Unless adaptation measures are taken, sea level rise could cost the globe $1 trillion annually by 2050.

What scientists just discovered in Greenland

A new study finds that climate change may affect the Greenland ice sheet more seriously than scientists could imagine.

The new study , published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, focuses on a part of the ice sheet known as “firn” – a porous layer of built-up snow that slowly freezes into ice over time. It’s considered an important part of the ice sheet because of its ability to trap and store excess water before it’s able to run off the surface of the glacier, an essential service that helps mitigate the sea-level rise that would otherwise be caused by the runoff water.

“As this layer is porous and the pores are connected, theoretically all the pore space in this firn layer can be used to store meltwater percolating into the firn whenever melt occurs at the surface,” said the new paper’s lead author, Horst Machguth of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland , in an email to The Washington Post. Over time, the percolating meltwater trickles down through the firn and refreezes.

Washington Post

Robotics Show RS 2015

Future is here. And you can see visiting World Robot Conference in Shanghai New International Expo Centre (SNIEC) 2015/11/03 – 2015/11/07. Show presents:
MIT’s robot-cheetah can now see and jump over obstacles

Honda’s Asimo robot keeps on learning

Germ-slaying robots fight infections
MIT’s robot-cheetah can now see and jump over obstacles2015-10-16

MITs crazy and amazing robotic cheetah has learned a new trick. Now, the four-legged robot that can run and jump like a real animal can detect and jump over obstacles. A video posted to MITs YouTube channel on May 28 shows the Cheetah 2 rob
Honda’s Asimo robot keeps on learning2015-10-16

The humanoid robot can run, climb stairs, kick balls — and even knows sign language. The updated Asimo showcases major technological advancements including increased motor skills and hand dexterity — he even knows sign language!
Germ-slaying robots fight infections2015-10-16

The health care and liability costs associated with infections are astronomical, and despite increasingly rigid policies and best practices designed to keep hospitals sterile, human workers aren’t great at disinfecting the thousands of surfa
DJI brings more drone diversity to its lineup with Phantom 3 Standard2015-10-16

DJIs Phantom 3 Advanced and Professional camera drones are remarkably simple to operate, which makes them great for people entering the hobby. Whats not so great: their prices. To help out your poor credit card, DJI has introduced the Phant
Teaching a robot to fall over without making a fool of itself2015-10-16

Humanoid robots are still, as weve seen from this years DARPA Robotics Challenge, not exactly feasible. While the compilation video of robots falling over was worth a guffaw or two, it also demonstrated a fundamental flaw in robotics: lack
Nao Co-Writer Teaches Handwriting by Feigning Ignorance2015-10-16

Children struggling with handwriting might one day benefit from a research project involving the Nao robot. The Nao Co-Writer interacts with the child using a tablet. First the child makes the word using magnetic letters. Next, the robot wr
Robot Hand Uses Light to Sense Force, Paving Way to Collaborative Humanoids2015-10-14

Robotics researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are experimenting with fiber optic sensors. The researchers created a highly sensitive robotic hand that uses optical sensors and light to sense force. The sensors may play an important rol
An air traffic control system for drones?2015-10-14

When you fly on a commercial airplane, you can recline into your neighbors knees secure in the knowledge that somewhere someone is watching a screen on which you and your airship are a little dot. That persons job is to keep your dot away f
Drone Pilot Demand Soars in China2015-09-30

Most drone enthusiasts already know that China will continue to play a huge role in the Game of Drones. After all, it is home to DJI, the company that currently holds 70 percent of the global commercial drone market. The firm has grown from
1 Million Drones Will Be Sold This Christmas, and the FAA Is Terrified2015-09-30

This week is a big one for our world

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels climbed above the 400 parts per million (ppm) and it’s distinctly possible they won’t be back below that level again in our lifetimes.

“As a human, though, passing both the 400 ppm and (potentially) the 1°C threshold within such a short time period makes it clear we are already living in a different world. We have blown past targets that were being considered as viable when I entered graduate school. We have significantly reduced the options available to us in the future. If we aren’t going to blow past the next set of thresholds — 500 ppm and 2°C — within just a few more decades, we have a lot of work to do in Paris in two weeks and beyond.” Katharine Hayhoe, atmospheric scientist at Texas Tech University.

What may hamper creativity?

Legos, the popular toy bricks, may be great for stimulating creativity in little kids. But when it comes to adults, things might be a little different. According to a new study in the Journal of Marketing Research, when adults are given a set of Legos to solve a well-defined problem, their creativity may suffer when tackling subsequent tasks.

“There are a lot of studies that explore what enhances creativity. Ours is one of the few that considers ways in which creativity may be undermined,” write the authors of the study, C. Page Moreau (University of Wisconsin) and Marit Gundersen Engeset (Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Norway). “What we find is that a well-defined problem–in our case, following an explicit set of instructions to build something with Legos–can actually hamper creativity in solving future problems.”

We’re ‘nowhere near ready

It sounds like something out of a science fiction novel, but killer robots are actually a serious threat.

“You see, we’re already at the dawn of the age of killer robots. And we’re completely unprepared for them”. The potential for lethal autonomous weapons systems to be rolled off the assembly line is here right now,” he says, “but the potential for lethal autonomous weapons systems to be deployed in an ethical way or to be designed in an ethical way is not, and is nowhere near ready.”, Ryan Gariepy, says.

Mr. Gariepy is the co-founder and CTO of Clearpath Robotics. Clearpath Robotics specializes in the design and manufacture of robust and reliable unmanned vehicle solutions for industrial research and development. Gariepy’s belief in the need for a strong global robotics community resulted in Clearpath being the first field robotics company to fully adopt and support ROS. Mr. Gariepy manages Clearpath’s technology strategy and serves as the company’s lead system architect.

“We can’t agree on how to implement those bits of guidance on the car,” Gariepy says. “And now what we’re actually talking about is taking that leap forward to building a system which has to decide on its own and when it’s going to preserve life and when it’s going to take lethal force.”

Gariepy says that, instead of developing missiles or drones that can decide on their own what target to hit, the military would be better off spending its money on improved sensors and anti-jamming technology. “Why don’t we take the investment that people would like to make in building fully autonomous killer robots and bring that investment into making existing drone technology more effective?” he says. “If we face and overcome them, we can bring that technology to the benefit of people outside of the military.”

The World of the Matrix begins

The super-sensation is the artificial womb exists. In Tokyo, researchers have developed a technique called EUFI — extrauterine fetal incubation. They have taken goat fetuses, threaded catheters through the large vessels in the umbilical cord and supplied the fetuses with oxygenated blood while suspending them in incubators that contain artificial amniotic fluid heated to body temperature.

Doctors are developing artificial wombs in which embryos can grow outside a woman’s body. The work has been hailed as a breakthrough in treating the childless.

Scientists have created prototypes made out of cells extracted from women’s bodies. Embryos successfully attached themselves to the walls of these laboratory wombs and began to grow. However, experiments had to be terminated after a few days to comply with in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) regulations.

Yoshinori Kuwabara, chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Juntendo University in Tokyo, has been working on artificial placentas for a decade. His interest grew out of his clinical experience with premature infants, and as he writes in a recent abstract, ”It goes without saying that the ideal situation for the immature fetus is growth within the normal environment of the maternal organism.”

Kuwabara and his associates have kept the goat fetuses in this environment for as long as three weeks. But the doctor’s team ran into problems with circulatory failure, along with many other technical difficulties. Pressed to speculate on the future, Kuwabara cautiously predicts that ”it should be possible to extend the length” and, ultimately, ”this can be applied to human beings.”

Read more We don’t need women either

First pilotless F-16

The US air force has test flown an F-16 fighter jet without a pilot on board for the first time in the latest sign of the military’s increasing reliance on drones.

The robotic F-16 flew for 55 minutes with an empty cockpit from a Florida base last week as part of a programme that would see the converted fighter jet used as a target for pilots in training, manufacturer Boeing said.

“It was really amazing to see an F-16 take off with nobody in it,” said Michelle Shelhamer from Boeing, which has adapted the plane for the US military.

The aircraft is one of six “retired” F-16 jets that would be used as aerial targets for fighter pilots training for air-to-air combat, she said.

“They’re basically built to be shot down,” she said. “It’s full-scale, real world, real life, combat training – not with a simulator or anything else.”

Will space tourism ever take off?

We live in fantastic times of fast growing high technologies, incredible scientific achievements and new space findings. Things that seemed completely impossible just a short while ago have turned into reality today, such as all these stunning pieces of new technology being infiltrated into our everyday lives changed instantly everything.

So, it’s extraordinary how far humanity has come as a species in a relatively short period of time! No doubt, the world has been changed dramatically but there is always more to discover, right?

Have you ever thought what’s the next or you do not like to think so far ahead? The next big step is space tourism of course, and then settlements of ordinary people are not so far as well. Space tourism is almost here.

Dennis Tito, a 61-year-old California millionaire and former NASA engineer, became the world’s first space tourist paying $20 million to Russian space agency for the fly in space. Now Dennis Tito is financing a new space project – mission to Mars by a two-person, an American man and woman, in 2018. Obivously space tourism is increasingly recognized as an important future market and there is good business plan behind it because millions of people want to go to space.

Reportedly that Kiwis booked on world’s first commercial space flight, a ticket on this flight costs over $234,000. Virgin Galactic hopes to be taking commercial flights outside of the earth’s atmosphere by 2014.